Thursday, April 4, 2013

Do you remember when ....

When did you buy your first cell phone? For me, it was 1996.

April 3, 1973: Motorola Calls AT&T ... by Cell   Wired

40 Years of the Cell Phone: Photos   Discovery - April 3, 2013

More People Have Cell Phones Than Toilets, U.N. Study Shows   TIME - March 2013

Along the way ...

With so many people addicted to drugs, this article shows promise ...

Resetting addicted brain: Laser light zaps away cocaine addiction   PhysOrg - April 3, 2013
By stimulating one part of the brain with laser light, researchers at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Ernest Gallo Clinic and Research Center at UC San Francisco (UCSF) have shown that they can wipe away addictive behavior in rats - or conversely turn non-addicted rats into compulsive cocaine seekers. "When we turn on a laser light in the prelimbic region of the prefrontal cortex, the compulsive cocaine seeking is gone," said Antonello Bonci, MD, scientific director of the intramural research program at the NIH's National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA), where the work was done.

BRAIN Initiative Launched to Unlock Mysteries of Human Mind   Science Daily - April 2, 2013
Today at the White House, President Barak Obama unveiled the "BRAIN" Initiative -- a bold new research effort to revolutionize our understanding of the human mind and uncover new ways to treat, prevent, and cure brain disorders like Alzheimer's, schizophrenia, autism, epilepsy, and traumatic brain injury. The NIH Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative is part of a new Presidential focus aimed at revolutionizing our understanding of the human brain. By accelerating the development and application of innovative technologies, researchers will be able to produce a revolutionary new dynamic picture of the brain that, for the first time, shows how individual cells and complex neural circuits interact in both time and space. Long desired by researchers seeking new ways to treat, cure, and even prevent brain disorders, this picture will fill major gaps in our current knowledge and provide unprecedented opportunities for exploring exactly how the brain enables the human body to record, process, utilize, store, and retrieve vast quantities of information, all at the speed of thought.